architecture
Feb 032 min read

Revolutionizing Architecture: 6 Sustainable Solutions for a Greener Future

written by

Nishita Verma

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Image Source: www.jdinstitute.edu.in

In an era where sustainability is not just a choice but a necessity, the architecture and design landscape is undergoing a paradigm shift. This blog embarks on a discovery of six forward-thinking sustainable materials, unlocking a world of possibilities to reduce energy consumption, enhance air quality, and contribute to a more sustainable future. As we explore the uses, advantages, and limitations of these materials, we invite you to envision a world where every design choice plays a role in nurturing our planet.

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Image Source: www.sciencedirect.com

1. Cross Laminated Timber (CLT)

Uses: Walls, beams, columns, and primary material for tall skyscrapers.

Pros:

  • Lightweight and structurally sound.

  • Reduced construction cost and time.

  • Flexibility in design.

Cons:

  • Higher cost compared to common building materials.

  • Increased transportation cost for modules.

  • Legal height restrictions in some areas for using wood.

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Image Image Source: arena.gov.au

2. Solar Glass

Uses: Facades, skylights, windows, especially in areas with moderate to high sun exposure.

Pros:

  • Sustainability and energy-saving capability.

  • Retains properties and aesthetics of normal glass.

  • Cost-effective.

Cons:

  • High initial fitting costs.

  • Solar conversion efficiency not on par with regular solar panels.

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Image Source: gharpedia.com

3. Pollution Absorbing Bricks

Uses: Air filtration, similar application as regular bricks.

Pros:

  • Aesthetic appeal comparable to exposed brick.

  • Inexpensive and energy-efficient.

Cons:

  • Requires double the area of a normal brick.

  • Not suitable for load-bearing structures beyond two floors.

  • Less efficient than alternative filtration systems.

imageImage Source: www.springwise.com

4. Cigarette Butt Bricks

Uses: Similar to regular bricks, aids in trapping toxic pollutants due to porosity.

Pros:

  • Lightweight, reducing transportation costs.

  • Better insulation, lowering heating & cooling costs.

  • Reduces toxic cigarette butt deposition.

Cons:

  • Strength reduction beyond a certain amount of cigarette butts.

  • Non-degradable butts may pose future challenges during demolition.

imageImage Source: gaiagreentech.com

5. Bioplastic

Uses: Interior design elements, product design (packaging, disposable products), pavilions, and other temporary structures.

Pros:

  • Sustainable alternative.

  • Biodegradable with a faster break-apart rate.

  • Significantly lower carbon footprint.

Cons:

  • Limited use in mainstream architecture.

  • Some bioplastics have a shorter lifespan and become fragile.

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Image Source: www.arch2o.com

6. Aluminum Foam

Uses: Modular fittings, intricate facade details, and larger structures with less material.

Pros:

  • Completely recyclable.

  • Highly flexible, moldable into any organic shape.

  • Pores can be manipulated for lighting and ventilation purposes.

Cons:

  • Difficulty in complete control over pore sizes during manufacturing.

Conclusion:

As the demand for sustainable living grows, integrating these innovative materials into designs not only supports eco-friendly practices but also contributes to a better living environment. Embracing alternative building materials is key to creating a sustainable and greener future.

Join our Facade Design Masterclass for Students and Architects and Advance Revit & BIM Certification Course to learn the advancements in the software handled by architects to create a positive impact and bring out sustainable design solutions in architectural projects. 



Nishita Verma

Nishita Verma

A creative graphic designer with a wanderlust for exploring diverse cultures and capturing their essence through travel.